Category Archives: playing

Rolling, Rolling, Rolling

A Random DiaBlog

A Post from 2016… We watched the Blues Brothers last night –

It’s 236 miles to York
I’ve got a tank full of gas
Half a pack of salt and vinegar crinkles
It’s light
And I’m wearing glasses
Hit it!

blues brothers

‘Move ’em on, head ’em up,
Head ’em up, move ’em on,
Move ’em on, head ’em up
Rawhide.

Keep Rolling & Playing

On a mission of God😉

Jane Tyson

I am who I say I am
And Who I say I am
That is Who I am

#BeSayDoLove #bluesbrothers #play #iambeic #frustrationexpert

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Adults stop playing because they worry they might fall over.

A Lesson From the Brownies 

Another ‘Random’ workshop with the Brownies this evening.
 
Before we did some moves, mindset and mindlessness, I did a little research for my ‘adult’ playful / random / mindlessful workshop this Saturday and asked them 3 questions –
 

What does the word ‘play’ mean to you? –

 
Friends
Games
Tablet
Donuts
 

‘Why Do Adults Stop Playing’?

 
Because of us
They haven’t got time
They give up
They can’t play, don’t know how to
Too old to be chased
Worried about falling over
We are faster than them and they get frustrated they can’t keep up
 

‘Why Do You Like To Play?’

 
  • Relax
  • Fun
  • Exercise
  • Problems go away
  • Builds Imagination
  • Reminds us that fun is important
  • Laughter is the best medicine
  • Gives us something to do
Adults what do you reckon to the Brownies list?
 
Next week I’m with teens at a Youth Club
brownies
link up with me at – janetyson.co.uk

What Will You Settle On Today?

What will you settle on today?

Some people love being preoccupied with thoughts.

Thoughts provide them with constant entertainment, interaction, they believe thinking is important.

They are addicted to distraction and fearful of boredom, inner silence, or feeling alone without them.

Our minds are often likened to busy monkeys leaping from tree to tree or butterflies fluttering from flower to flower.

#frustrationexpert (2)

We are good at multitasking, reacting, and scanning for the pleasant, unpleasant or neutral and choosing all the time between them.

Life is fast paced, work is busy, families are doing, schools are cramming…

So what can we settle on today to stabilise our mind and respond more to situations?

How can we allow the butterfly to settle, the monkey to still?

Jane Tyson

Whooo Cares

A Random DiaBlog

Lessons from a Wise Owl

What does it feel like to you when your relationships are in balance, you are relaxed and calm, you have clarity,  focus, confidence, connection and you get thing done efficiently with few power struggles?

This weekend I’ve been on a truly special Connected Communications Course created and run by the wonderful and wise Lis Cashin –  2 days with very inspirational women exploring Lis’ R.E.A.L approach.

Meditation on an Owl

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Since I was a young child I’ve been fascinated with Owls, I often hear them and see them and it’s only in the last couple of years that I incorporate them into my meditation practice. I ponder them silently  and wisely watching, sensing, blinking and still, behaviours I am aware of and try to embody throughout the day.

By coming from this space of stillness and quiet we have time to notice our breath, observe and respond with grace. I wrote more about this a couple of weeks ago – take a breath.

This links in nicely with aspects of  Lis’ R.E.A.L approach,  and I’m really excited to be weaving this into my BeSayDoLove© practice with children and parents.

Whooo Cares

Practice being an owl, you might look a bit of a twit but whoo cares.

Jane #RandomDialogue

Giving You A Powerful Voice, Vision and Choices

Why not join our Meet Up group where we run a number of events & meet ups across the year for adults, kids, businesses and families.

You might also enjoy Aypee’s blog  BE SAY DO HAVE

 

A Bored Book.

A ‘Bored’ Book

How many times a day do your children tell you they are bored?

Maybe you have children who can easily entertain themselves, and spend the day just making, creating and playing, I’d really love to hear from you for this idea.

I notice that if kids are on their computers, tablets, phones, PS4s etc they never seem to tire.  It’s when they come off them that they find it hard to transition from this over stimulated time to a space where they now have to do something ‘boring’ instead.

Screens produce an experience we can’t recreate

I read once that when we are on our screens, certain chemicals are released – maybe it was dopamine or seratonin – that can’t be recreated in the brain at the same levels once we come off.  For example, as a teacher, I cannot replicate the multisensory stimulation that a screen induces, hence children don’t always listen so well, sit still, retain information and they get bored quicker, however if I put on a YouTube clip explaining the same thing, they are all eyes, ears and interest for a long time, it is their language.

File 20-02-2017 15 37 12

This photo was taken when we were in Africa. These kids played and collaborated endlessly with the tyre, they had no screens.

What do kids do when they aren’t on screens?

My son had a friend over, they’d had some screen time together and the hour timer was up, so after a few reminders they came off and didn’t know what to do. They asked to go back on again and we said no that they could go and find something else. This  quite often means they go round the friend’s house to play on the screens there instead.

It took them about 10 minutes to transition to outdoor play and they soon found themselves engaged in a nerf gun war, followed by fire building with Paul in the garden. With the screens off, they had to find something to do, it’s so easy though sometimes to just let them go back on again and loose track of time. They might mope about inbetween waiting for their next fix.  Meanwhile, we also bury our faces in Facebook, Twitter, Gmail etc, driven to distraction.

Why are we so Bored?

We know it’s good to be bored, creativity often stems from boredom and head space. Why though are we so bored? Some say we are over-stimulated, the more we have the more we need and it’s hard to put up with the slow stuff in between. Are you reading this whilst doing or thinking about other things at the same time?  Or maybe it’s too long and boring to even read. Our kids are no different.

A ‘bored’ book for kids written by kids.

I’d like to create an e-book of ideas for kids of things to do when they aren’t on their screens. I’d love your children to contribute to this please, and if they are willing to, could you share their ideas in the comments below with an image if possible of the activity.  I’ll obviously give them a credit.  All ages welcome.

Things to do that are free, with little or no adult intervention.  I wonder if we they can come up with 3 or more boring ideas?

Jane x

janetyson.co.uk

What did you have for lunch, who did you play with?

Did you eat all your peas and carrots…

Would you like your child to speak to you more and share their feelings openly and freely with you without asking? Read on as this will help.

Scenario 1 – you greet your child after a busy day and ask them all about it – who they played with, what they had for lunch, did they eat all their peas and carrots, what they did in maths, have they got homework and so. You ask them question after question (some parents I spoke to say they question like this because they feel they ‘ought’ to).

Scenario 2– your child is playing with for example their lego, you go over to join in and begin to take over. Maybe you want the bricks to match, the windows aren’t in the right place, and the door opens the wrong way.  You start to question and probe and join in with their play in a rather controlling way.  The child soon looses interest, walks off and you start to worry about their lack of commitment and connection!

Scenario 3 – your teen is in their room, the door is closed they are on their screen, you haven’t had a conversation in a while.

Do any of these sound familiar to you?

Let’s Rewind the Scenes

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How could you just enjoy being ‘alongside’ them?

‘There once was a wise man who said nothing’

How about you just sit there with them, in the moment and just be and not actually do anything. That’s right just be quiet. Breathe, sit and be with them. It might be hard not to talk and take over – so practice. They’ve been over-stimulated, over stretched and haven’t stopped all day, their brains are full!  Allow them a break.  It’s OK to be quiet, allow yourself to be quiet too.

Reframe the situation, what can we learn from the child, what are they teaching us about being in the moment? Notice them.

Soon, they will start to enjoy your peaceful presence and invite you into their space and start to engage with you.  You may even find they start to guide you with what to do, ask you questions and  even tell you things that are on their mind because you have allowed them some space and time alongside you, they feel free and safe to express themselves.   Resist asking them too much and taking over, enjoy being childlike with them for a while. With older children you may say something like I’m just going to come and sit with you for a while, so you watch them on their screen for 10 minutes or so, again you don’t need to speak you are just alongside them, see what happens you will be surprised.

Little and often.

To a Child Love Is Spelled T-I-M-E (1)

IamBe Approach

Are you wanting a little guidance and support to help you to communicate and connect within your family? I am an IAmBeic Master Practitioner, more details about what I do are over on my Linked-In page here which includes a full list of workshops including our ‘BE SAY DO HAVE’ Ⓒ Contented Parenting model here.

Jane Tyson x

Whilst at University studying Education and Child Psychology,  I volunteered with various ‘play’ schemes and trained as a ‘Play Leader’ alongside children in mainstream and special educational need settings from 4 to 18. These experiences led me into Primary School teaching and yoga and mindfulness for families.  My stepmother and two step sisters are both play therapists, so I’ve been pretty immersed and passionate about play for 25 years, well 45.  

Core Process – Exploring Play.